best option to replace Freelander1 TD4

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chris1959

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My 2003 Freelander1 TD4 is now 20 years old. I have had it for 16 Years. mileage now 126K. It is serviced regularly by an independent LR specialist that I trust. Generally it is in very good order but it is increasingly costly to maintain. I do some jobs myself (electric window replacements, hose upgrades) but I do not have space or time to do "crawling underneath jobs". I am not ready to replace it just yet but I am trying to identify a suitable much newer replacement vehicle. I do not want anything more than 4 years old unless it was exceptionally low mileage so this rules out Freelander2. (I think a 9 year old car may well be in worse shape than mine because I know mine has been well looked after with many new parts).
I test drove a new Suzuki Vitara Allgrip today and found it to be very "car like" but it seems to have poor ground clearance and I was not very impressed generally with its overall finish - too many electronic fripperies which I don't want or need. Although I only use mine on tracks (for fishing) these can be quite rough and I fear the Vitara (while better than many so called SUVs) is not really up to the job.
Outside of Freelander 2 what do others think is a sensible replacement?
 
Keep the Freelander, and find someone to look after it properly for you. As long as it's not rusting underneath, then mechanicals should go on for a long time yet. 126k is nothing for a well maintained TD4, many double that mileage.
The Freelander 2 is a much more modern, much more advanced, and just as long lived. Mine is now 15, but looks 10 years younger, and drives like new. So I'd not dismiss a Freelander 2 based on age, as condition and how its been looked after are much more important.
The Discovery Sport is the direct descendant of the FL2, with much the same capabilities off road, but also much better on the road. However I'd avoid the Ingenium engine, as they are far from reliable.

I'm not in a position to recommend other AWD vehicles, even though we've had a few. The Ford Kuga drove ok, but the electric coupling went noisy at 50k, which apparently was due to mismatched tyres being fitted. Ford picked up the tab, as it was a main dealer that fitted the mismatched tyres in the first place.

The VW Tiguan was a nightmare, it was always in the dealer having something fixed. We had a curtesy car more than we had the Tiguan on the drive.

That's it for AWD vehicles unless I include the wife's Audis. I currently have 2 Freelander 2s, both lovely to drive.
 
Keep the Freelander, and find someone to look after it properly for you. As long as it's not rusting underneath, then mechanicals should go on for a long time yet. 126k is nothing for a well maintained TD4, many double that mileage.
The Freelander 2 is a much more modern, much more advanced, and just as long lived. Mine is now 15, but looks 10 years younger, and drives like new. So I'd not dismiss a Freelander 2 based on age, as condition and how its been looked after are much more important.
The Discovery Sport is the direct descendant of the FL2, with much the same capabilities off road, but also much better on the road. However I'd avoid the Ingenium engine, as they are far from reliable.

I'm not in a position to recommend other AWD vehicles, even though we've had a few. The Ford Kuga drove ok, but the electric coupling went noisy at 50k, which apparently was due to mismatched tyres being fitted. Ford picked up the tab, as it was a main dealer that fitted the mismatched tyres in the first place.

The VW Tiguan was a nightmare, it was always in the dealer having something fixed. We had a curtesy car more than we had the Tiguan on the drive.

That's it for AWD vehicles unless I include the wife's Audis. I currently have 2 Freelander 2s, both lovely to drive.
Hi Thanks for both replies, I am frustrated that, in my opinion, there is nothing now available on the market that fits my needs anywhere near as well as my existing TD4. So I pretty much agree with both your comments. I note your views on the Freelander2. I had rejected the Disco Sport as far too big and moribund with electronic rubbish.
Many car reviews seem to focus on "infotainment" rather than long term reliability and maintainability.
I was looking into the Evoque as a possibility (because its not too big and seems capable off road in 4X4 versions) but I would need to avoid the ingenium engine given your comments.
Here is some background.
Last year I had a partial respray (boot and roof) due to pealing clear coat (perhaps 20 years of sun / UV) and also had the entire front and rear suspension replaced (4 shocks, springs and ancilliaries) with new including all new genuine poly-bushes, this was not necessary but I wanted to rejuvenate the feel of the vehicle - which it did. Also had its second new VCU (at 120k miles) and support bearings - total cost was around £4.5k including its annual service and all the parts and labour.
Engine, brakes, drivetrain, wheels, tyres are fine as is the interior, new sunroof glass two years back - now leak-tight - what a nuisance sunroofs are! What has prompted me to look at alternatives is the current need for a new rear subframe (which I have to replace in order to get next MOT). I cannot see the merit in buying a used one because mine looked fine last MOT but has somehow taken a bad turn for the worse this year (it is after all 20 years old and seems to have corroded from the inside). There doesn't seem to be any structural corrosion elsewhere but obviously there is some rust visible here and there. There were no advisories with last year's MOT. New subframe is £640 quid plus around £500 to remove old one and replace (this anticipates the possibility of captive nuts failing on removal and needing welding of new ones) so it may be cheaper. I am getting the new subframe to my home first so I can give it two coats of paint and dinitrol its interior before it is fitted. My fear is that there is some (unweldable) issue that may come to light in the near future (so nullifying all the expense) but I am not sure how likely that is ? I do about 70-80 miles per year on tracks which includes some quite rutted areas but otherwise its all on road use.
For the moment I will persevere with the TD4 and hope I get a year or so without big bills.
Thanks Chris
 
Hi Thanks for both replies, I am frustrated that, in my opinion, there is nothing now available on the market that fits my needs anywhere near as well as my existing TD4. So I pretty much agree with both your comments. I note your views on the Freelander2. I had rejected the Disco Sport as far too big and moribund with electronic rubbish.
Many car reviews seem to focus on "infotainment" rather than long term reliability and maintainability.
I was looking into the Evoque as a possibility (because its not too big and seems capable off road in 4X4 versions) but I would need to avoid the ingenium engine given your comments.
Here is some background.
Last year I had a partial respray (boot and roof) due to pealing clear coat (perhaps 20 years of sun / UV) and also had the entire front and rear suspension replaced (4 shocks, springs and ancilliaries) with new including all new genuine poly-bushes, this was not necessary but I wanted to rejuvenate the feel of the vehicle - which it did. Also had its second new VCU (at 120k miles) and support bearings - total cost was around £4.5k including its annual service and all the parts and labour.
Engine, brakes, drivetrain, wheels, tyres are fine as is the interior, new sunroof glass two years back - now leak-tight - what a nuisance sunroofs are! What has prompted me to look at alternatives is the current need for a new rear subframe (which I have to replace in order to get next MOT). I cannot see the merit in buying a used one because mine looked fine last MOT but has somehow taken a bad turn for the worse this year (it is after all 20 years old and seems to have corroded from the inside). There doesn't seem to be any structural corrosion elsewhere but obviously there is some rust visible here and there. There were no advisories with last year's MOT. New subframe is £640 quid plus around £500 to remove old one and replace (this anticipates the possibility of captive nuts failing on removal and needing welding of new ones) so it may be cheaper. I am getting the new subframe to my home first so I can give it two coats of paint and dinitrol its interior before it is fitted. My fear is that there is some (unweldable) issue that may come to light in the near future (so nullifying all the expense) but I am not sure how likely that is ? I do about 70-80 miles per year on tracks which includes some quite rutted areas but otherwise its all on road use.
For the moment I will persevere with the TD4 and hope I get a year or so without big bills.
Thanks Chris
 
Honestly I feel your pain
I am in the same position but more reluctant to borrowing money
so the dogs feel more upmarket in a flash new car

So I have finally found a replacement for my old one
I will be picking a new Freelander 1 up on Sunday
this as never been welded or failed a test and @ 17 is in excellent condition
with a little more 100k o. The clock
so I am going to attack it with rust proofing and hopefully i will keep the rot away

I have a second hand rear subframe off a 04 year it’s basically as new
I will send you pictures so you can make your own mind up about using second hand part
this cost me £0 and by time I get it powered coated probably £50
good for life
 

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If you've spent all that on your FL1, then it's definitely got to be a keeper. You've done must of the things that can cause issues, so niggles aside, it should be good for another 10 year's, by which times we'll all be onto EV ownership anyway. I'm keeping my FL2 until it falls apart, or I replace it with an EV.
 
Don’t think there is much size difference between an Evoque and Disco Sport. They are built on the same platform.

My brother had a Jeep Renegade Deserthawk (a variation of the Trail Hawk). Quite comparable abilities wise to the Freelander 1. But faster, more economical, better on road and better off road. Boot is slightly smaller and you maybe feel as though you are sitting lower. But good usable space.

Suspect a Dacia Duster fits the bill of a modern Freelander 1 quite well too.

Some of the Subarus also worth looking at.

Not sure if it will be sold here. The new Ford Bronco Sport would be a pretty good match up too IMO.

I would say nothing from Land Rover though. They just aren’t interested in that part of the market any longer.
 
I really like the new Suzuki Jimny. Yes, it's small but if you don't have kids, it's plenty of room. It's a classic already so the value won't drop that much even if you buy it new.
 
I really like the new Suzuki Jimny. Yes, it's small but if you don't have kids, it's plenty of room. It's a classic already so the value won't drop that much even if you buy it new.
We can't buy them new as a car in the UK now. Unfortunately there's some emissions regulation that they don't comply with as a car, so they can only be legally sold in the UK as a 2 seater van.

Having been lucky enough to try one, I'd personally avoid it. It's incredibly unrefined on the road, noisy, bouncy, with very wooly steering. Getting out after a 10 minute drive was a relief, and driving home in my Freelander 2 felt luxurious. Definitely one I'd avoid, unless I really needed the off road capability, which I don't.
 
LR sort of did build the FL3, but they called is a Discovery Sport instead. The problem with all modern LRs and vehicles in general is this obsession for including huge amounts of tech to push the prices up.
I'm not anti tech, but I find my FL2 has more than enough, actually a bit too much, like the stupid key dock. I'd be more than happy with an ignition key.
Unfortunately the more gadgets and gizmos that manufacturers fit to their vehicles, the higher the price goes, and the long term reliability falls.
 
LR sort of did build the FL3, but they called is a Discovery Sport instead. The problem with all modern LRs and vehicles in general is this obsession for including huge amounts of tech to push the prices up.
I'm not anti tech, but I find my FL2 has more than enough, actually a bit too much, like the stupid key dock. I'd be more than happy with an ignition key.
Unfortunately the more gadgets and gizmos that manufacturers fit to their vehicles, the higher the price goes, and the long term reliability falls.
Yeh, the DS is sort of what they replaced the Freelander with. But as said, its to big, got to many seats and to up market.

We have Merc Sprinters at work that go one step further than the already stupid key dock and do a proximity thing on the key/fob. Its fookin ridiculous, you can't control when the ignition is on and off.
 
My plan is to build a 'new' F1. Have bought a nice Tangiers orange 1.8 with engine problems. An HSE with good trim and a rotten bottom and am researching the best engine to fit without too much trauma.

Underside will be professionally cleaned and re undersealed, then new suspension, brakes and bushes.

Just redoing headlining as old one was dropping orange coloured sticky foam everywhere. Repaired sunroof while it was out.

Can't decide on VVC or Turbo. It will come down to who can produce an easy swap ECU.!!
 
I
We can't buy them new as a car in the UK now. Unfortunately there's some emissions regulation that they don't comply with as a car, so they can only be legally sold in the UK as a 2 seater van.

Having been lucky enough to try one, I'd personally avoid it. It's incredibly unrefined on the road, noisy, bouncy, with very wooly steering. Getting out after a 10 minute drive was a relief, and driving home in my Freelander 2 felt luxurious. Definitely one I'd avoid, unless I really needed the off road capability, which I don't.
So much nonsense and wrong info....

Currently you can only buy them in 'commercial' spec. But you can obviously still buy them used too. Op never said anything about only new vehicles.

And it wasn't emissions regs they didn't comply with. That is all BS. The Jimny is pretty clean, the manual car is something like 154g/km of Co2, way less than almost any other petrol or diesel 4x4 on the market. However EU regs penalise lightweight vehicles. If it had weighed a tonne more, it could quite happily have pumped out double the emissions with no adverse effect.


As for the ride/noise, wtf. You are talking utter crap I'm afraid. Have done 22,000 miles in mine. They are brilliant on the road.
 
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